“12 Tribes” Cult Exposed from the Inside in New Book

Source: Patheos.com
April 13, 2019 by David G. McAfee
4 Comments

If you can’t imagine what it’s like to be sucked into a religious cult, you should read this new book.

I did the editing!
The Kindle version of Better Than A Turkish Prison, which gives an inside look into a popular religious cult, is out now by Hypatia Press!

A lot of people, especially those of us who are atheists and skeptics, don’t know what it’s like to be religious. But even fewer understand how it’s possible to fall into a strict religious cult. That’s exactly what happened to the author of this book, and he tells the whole story in his own words.

In his case, the cult is the Twelve Tribes, “a confederation of twelve self-governing tribes” that claims to be “disciples of the Son of God whose name in Hebrew is Yahshua.”

From the cult’s own website:

“We follow the pattern of the early church in Acts 2:44 and 4:32, truly believing everything that is written in the Old and New Covenants of the Bible, and sharing all things in common.”

That poor little girl...
Image from the cult’s site.

The author, Sinasta J. Colucci, tells a deeply personal story about his many encounters with the infamous Twelve Tribes group. And it shows exactly how it’s possible for anyone to fall in with a cult, provided the circumstances push them in that direction.Here is some background from the text on the back cover:

Better Than a Turkish Prison is the true story of a needy young man who encounters a religious cult known as “The Twelve Tribes”. With no better options in sight, he decides to join them in their pursuit to build the kingdom of God on Earth. After years of brainwashing and servitude, he must break free from a powerful delusion in his search for freedom and truth. Not merely a deeply personal portrayal of one man’s struggles, this book also serves as a critical analysis of religious ideals and their effects on humanity as the author divulges his presently held beliefs.

Whether you’ve heard of the Twelve Tribes cult or not, I highly recommend the book Better Than a Turkish Prison.

Yours in Reason,

David

Comments posted on Patheos.com:

  • nabashalam

    Here is a great website that will open your eyes to this destructive high control fundamentalist Messianic cult. http://question12tribes.com/

  • digital bookworm

    It was Arcadia. Very small town on the Peace River near Port Charlotte and Fort Myers. Although there is an Agricultural extension of South Florida University in the town, I don’t think they try to recruit there. (They wouldn’t have much luck if they did.) The town is known as the antique capitol of Florida (which is why I was there) and is famous for it’s rodeo.

  • digital bookworm

    I got to know one of these groups in central Florida 2 years ago. They were planning on opening one of their Yellow Delis near the downtown area. (Maybe they have by now.) They (meaning the leader of the group) owned a rambling mansion in the historic district, where the 15 to 20 of them lived communally. They were nice, talkative and always inviting anyone to come to dinner on Friday night. An aquaintance of mine was always after me to go sometime, but I was afraid of what I might say. From what I had been told, the women and men ate separately, with the women doing all the cooking and serving. They could then eat after the men were finished. The children were spookily well behaved. They weren’t allowed toys or games as these were seen as a waste of time better spent doing chores and learning from the patriarch. They were allowed to ride bikes.
    They weren’t quite like the Amish, as they made use of cars and power tools (good carpenters). But they did wear very plain clothes, (probably all cotton of course).
    I looked up some articles about them years ago and discovered that the Twelve Tribes groups that opened Yellow Delis were getting in trouble for not paying any wages to their members who volunteered to work in their deli. (True communism at work)

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